Marhofn 280.16 - May 2014

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Baglogs (72 of them):

Gordon Ingall (+24=1229)

My tally for 2013 was the biggest for some years, helped by the first new English hills since 2006 with a long overdue visit to the south and south-west. The final tally was one less than initially planned, due to self-inflicted financial austerity. Trigpoint pillars seemed to be a recurring theme. The one on Nine Barrow Down was several hundred metres from the summit, dumped lying down on the southern slopes with its concrete base still attached. The work of a very large giant? Trigpoint collectors will be disappointed there was no metal work or identity remaining.

Pillar down on Nine Barrow Down (photo; Alan Dawson)

Pillar down on Nine Barrow Down (photo; Alan Dawson)

The pillar on Christ Cross was even more difficult to locate, presumably hidden behind dense and unyielding vegetation, despite the advice in Alasdair Dibb's 'The hills of southern England' that it is '28 paces up from the track '. Despite auditioning for the Ministry of Silly Walks I could find nothing; perhaps my legs are too short. A visit with gardening gloves and heavy-duty secateurs or in mid-winter to avoid the brambles might prove more successful.

The final trigpoint encounter was the most significant. My reluctance to purchase OS maps covering one or two hills in an area that I am unlikely to revisit has its drawbacks and navigating by road atlas has its limitations. A visit to a local shop or filling station for a quick browse usually suffices for a drive-by bag. Cleeve Hill was deemed too obvious to require this on the journey to north Wales. After strolling up from the viewpoint car park, I arrived at a pillar and a millennium view indicator nearby making it seem very convincing. However, alarmingly, the indicator gave a meticulous height of 317.5m, whereas my road atlas had said it was 330m. Suspiciously higher ground to the south added to my doubts and a quick look at a map in a local filling station confirmed the cock-up, the 330m trigpoint pillar is two kilometres to the south. Maybe there is a moral or two here. Anyway, the Cotswolds are worthy of a little more respect and a little more time for exploration on my next attempt.

Musing on the issue of collecting maps which may never be referenced again, I wondered if an exchange map club would be practical and concluded it would probably be impractical.

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